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Incense Burning Methods

Incense Burning Methods

There are many different incense burning techniques - each incense tradition has a different method, or a few distinct methods in which heat or fire are used to release the scent of fragrant materials. I would like to introduce to you and explore the main ones, as well as explain the unique benefits and characteristics derived from each method.


Smudging:
Direct burning of a single plant. 
The most primitive way of enjoying aromatics, is that of lighting them afire which in turn will release a thick, aromatic smoke. The most ancient way of doing this is by using a single raw aromatic, that is on its own combustible. It is, essentially, like burning a little fire (controlled and contained), of either a bundle of dried herbs, or a chunk of wood. This can be done either ceremonially, or for fumigation purposes (for example, as an insect repellent). 

The most known culture to use this technique to this day are the First Nations of North America: in their smudging ceremonies, local botanicals such sage, sagebrush, cedar leaf, western red cedar, and sweetgrass are used for clearing a space and preparing it for a ritual, to cleanse the aura of a person, and for healing. A similar tradition and technique is used in Central America with Palo Santo chips. 

Because these plants are only partially combustible, it is best to use a feather or a fan during the burning, to aerate the incense and continue its burn. This method is especially suitable for open spaces and the outdoors, where the wind can also help continue the burn. Additionally, the smoke can be quite strong and leave a scorched after-smell, which is not to everyone's liking as an "environmental scent" per se. 

Singeing: 
Another ancient technique, but slightly more delicate is that of singeing. This is an incomplete burn of finer botanicals, such as the fine fragrant hair of Mother Earth - sweetgrass, and also other botanicals that are perhaps not completely combustible, such as flowers, wispy leaves, conifer needles, and thin branches. Place them in a small heat-proof vessel such as ceramic bowl or cast-iron cauldron, and light with fire. Try using this technique for more delicate aromatics as well, pearly everlasting flowers for example.  

Circle Style:
A method that you may be familiar with if you've ever attended a Sweatlodge ceremony: On a hot rock - usually a lava rock - or on a very hot iron, such as an iron cauldron or on top of an iron fireplace - one would place the fragrant botanicals or incense blend. 
This enables enjoying the fragrance of materials that are not combustible on their own, such as fragrant resins and certain plants that are too delicate for direct burning. This method is used mostly in Sweatlodge ceremony, when different kinds of medicine are tossed on the hot rocks that enter the sweat lodge. The medicine person leading the ceremony would choose the appropriate plants and resins in each door to the elements, and throughout the prayers and chants: sage, artemisia, cedar leaf, pine needles, piñon pine resin, sweetgrass, copal and palo santo are most often used in this context; but it is technically possible to use any leaf, wood, resin or spice with singeing. Try using it for more delicate aromatics as well, pearly everlasting flowers for example. 

Charcoal Burning: 
You may be most familiar with this incense burning method from churches, but it is not the first tradition that used it. It has likely originated in the Middle East, where it is still used to this day. And there are many different types of incense that can be burnt over a hot charcoal, creating different experience and nuances, depending on the particular technique for creating the incense to be placed on the charcoal, as well as the individual botanicals selected. Charcoal burning releases a lot of smoke, and is suitable for larger spaces (such as the church) and the outdoors. It is quite an involved technique, requiring one to tend the charcoal, toss it and even fan on it occasionally, remove the spent material if it develops an unpleasant scorched smell, and regularly sprinkle with new fragrant incense on top. What usually determines the length of time during which this kind of incense will be burnt is the size of the charcoal, as usually only a small amount of aromatics is needed to release a lot of scent. The other factor is of course the sizes of space, and the stamina of the attendees. 

For this method, several tools are required:
1) Censor - a special vessel that is heat proof to hold the charcoal and the ashes. If you do not have a designated censor, you can use a heat-proof ceramic bowl filled with sand, and place the charcoal on top. This will also enable you to handle the bowl more easily (the copper censors become unsafe to handle, which is why most of them have a chain).
2) Tongs - for handling the charcoal and the incense
3) Matches, a lighter or a little torch (the one used for burning off the sugar and forming the desired crust on creme brûlée). 
4) Charcoal - it is best to use saltpetre-free charcoal, but that will also mean you'll need a good lighter and a lot of patience to wait for it to light up. You may use coconut charcoal that is used for shisha (waterpipe), or the fine, high-end Japanese bamboo square charcoals used in Koh-doh (more on that later) - but these are costly and run out really fast. I find that the easiest way to light both of these types of charcoals is by simply placing it on the small flame of a gas stove. So if you have one use it as well. Let it sit there for a few minutes, until the charcoal gets covered with a silvery looking ash. If you don't have a gas stove, the other solution to lighting saltpetre-free charcoal is by using a small torch, like the kind you'd use to burn the sugar off the surface of Crème Brûlée. If you place the incense on it earlier, it will either suffocate the charcoal, or create an unpleasant smell from an overly rapid burning of your incense. 

Single Pure Resins:
Frankincense and myrrh are most famous for use on hot charcoal, but they are not the only ones - benzoin, mastic, sandarac, dammar, copal, ammoniacum, etc. are examples for other important fragrant resins from around the world. 

Loose Incense:
A mixture or resins, or resins with other aromatics - wood chips, spices, herbs, citrus peel, flowers and more, that were carefully design and blended, and preferably also aged prior to burning. 

Incense Pastilles:
Most known for their use in the Greek Orthodox church, incense pastilles are a compounded mixture of fragrant resins, spices, woods, flowers, herbs etc, that are finely powdered and then bound together with liquid (either water, wine or alcohol). Nowadays, most of the incense pastilles found commercially are a mixture of franckinense, benzoin and synthetic aroma chemicals bound with gum. That's why you'll find many flowers that usually aren't that useful in incense in their dried form; or are just way too experience to use as an extract (essential oil or absolute). Incense pastilles may be either an irregular shape, usually dusted with golden mica powder for visual effect; or is pressed flat and then scored into small squares or diamonds, in the Greek Monastery fashion, and typically dyed with colours that would match the flower they are perfumed with (i.e.: pink pastilles that are rose-scented). Pastilles are burnt just like any other resin, small pieces are broken, and sprinkled onto the charcoal as needed throughout the ceremony or event. 

Kyphi 
Considered the first perfume in history, whose formulae was found and translated by the Greeks on several papyri; and a couple of others recorded on temple walls in Egypt. Kyphi contained 16 distinct botanicals, processed in many elaborate   steps over the course of several weeks, resulting in a sweet, haunting perfume that is both sensual and relaxing. All Kyphi formulae containing besides the aromatics also honey, raisins and wine as binders - whose sugars produce an impressively thick and sweet-smelling smoke. It was burnt in the temples at the close of the day, in preparation for dream work; and by the aristocracy to banish the worries of the day, as well as a personal perfume. It was even ingested as medicine. Nowadays, recreations and reinterpretations of Kyphi by artisan incense makers are usually burnt on a charcoal as well, but also used in the next method we'll describe, which is smokeless.  

Incense Warming:
Incense warming is a most refined and economic way to enjoy scent. Rather than burning or evaporating it rapidly, as you would with incense you light on fire, or perfume you apply to the skin after being years in the making - incense warming is a technique that uses a fraction of the amount of incense material, and gets impact over a long period of time. 

There are a few methods of incense warming, the most sophisticated is the Japanese technique of filling a Koh-Doh cup with rice-ash, in which a fully lit bamboo charcoal is buried. The fine and fluffy ash allows it to continue "breathing". On top of the charcoal, there is a tunnel in the ash, upon which a thin square of mica - called a mica plate - is gently placed. The mica transfers the heat in an even way for as long as the charcoal ember is alive. On top of this different fragrant materials - usually hair-thin slivers of precious woods are placed, or Neri-Koh. Resins are less ideal for burning in this method, because they melt and ooze out and leave a mess on the mica plate that could spill over into the ash. The main disadvantage of this method is that is requires expertise and specialized tools for every step, otherwise the precious woodchips would fall into the rice ash and disappear, or the mica plate may topple over when the scents are switched around. Another aspect to take into account is is that there is a finite time for this incense, only long as the buried charcoal ember is alive - and only an experienced koh-doh master can time this out properly. The main advantages are the very fine scent one gets from the materials, it is definitely most suitable for precious woods such as agarwood. And it is inherently ritualistic and ceremonial, creating a very special atmosphere and reverence for the materials and the occasion. Another neat thing is that the Koh-Doh cup can be held by the participants and lifted very close to one's nostrils, to fully appreciate and experience the scent. The passing around of the cup creates intimacy and anticipation, and creates an even greater enjoyment, as well as bond between the participants. 

Simplified, less ceremonial methods that don't require much expertise and produce similar results are either with an aromatherapy diffuser or an electric incense heater. Both of these methods are very easy to use and clean between materials, and can be used also for sticky resins, as well as Kyphi - just like the aromatherapy diffuser. 

You will need a simple, low-tech aromatherapy diffuser, preferably made of porcelain or glazed ceramics, or possibly pyrex glass, which is easier to keep clean and spreads the heat gently but evenly. Place the incense materials in the bowl on top, and light the candle underneath. This will produce scent for hours - sometimes the incense materials may even outlive the candle. The disadvantage is that this apparatus gets very hot to handle, and can't really be lifted up and sniffed up close or passed away among friends like you could do with the the Koh-Doh cup. If you don't have a porcelain, pyrex or glazed ceramic bowl for the aromatics, you may place a small piece of aluminum foil over the bowl to line it and prevent cross-contamination of fragrances from burnt or melted over resins, honey, raisins, etc. 

An even simpler way is more high-tech, and requires an electric incense heater that was especially designed for this purpose. They are usually made of porcelain and shaped as Koh-Doh cups, and produce a very fine scent, for many days, from a very small materials. There is often also a temperature control dial which helps control the heat and adjust it appropriately for different substances. A disadvantage here again is the inability to handle and smell the aromatics up close when they are burnt, and also that this apparatus is even less portable than the aromatherapy diffuser, as it is plugged into electricity. 

Now let's explore the types of incense materials used with the heating methods: 

Single Woods (as in Koh-Doh Ceremony):
In the Edo period, the Japanese aristocracy and Samurai classes have perfected the art of incense, focusing entirely on woods: local woods such as hinoki and hiba, as well as the imported fragrant woods of sandalwood and agarwood (jinkoh). 


Nerikoh
Nerikoh:
Similarly to Kyphi, nerikoh also contains honey and dried fruits, which adds an inherent sweetness to any composition. In both cases, it is believed that the sweeteners were used to sugarcoat the bitter spices and herbs before ingesting them, as a medicinal preparation (before the invention of capsules and softgel and pills). Literally, nerikoh means "kneaded incense". An incense "dough" of spices, woods and resins is prepared, with honey and dried plums or apricots to bind them together. They are rolled into capsule-sized pellets, and aged for a minimum of six months. Nerikoh is traditionally enjoyed in autumn during Cha-Doh - the Japanese tea ceremony. Just like the slivers of woods enjoyed in Koh-Doh, Nerikoh is placed on the heated micah plate. Modern incense enthusiasts both in Japan and abroad also warm it on an incense heater - either electric or over a tea light candle. 

Combustible Incense:
The most user-friendly and simple to burn is also the most sophisticated incense to make. Combustible incense is incense in which both aromatics, binder and combustible agents are masterfully blended to make an incense that is self-burning. These are shaped into a few different forms, and each has its own unique  characteristics. 

Incense Cones
Incense Cones: 
Originated in Japan in the 19th Century, incense cones are now also very popular with Indian incense. They can be either hand-shaped or shaped with a mold, and have a thick enough base to make them stand on their own. That makes them very easily portable and enables them to burn on any heat and fire proof surface, without the need for any special tools or dishes. You can even burn them outdoors on the ground. Cones are low maintenance to burn (as long as they were properly made). They are easier to make and use for amateur incense makers. Because a larger amount of incense material is burnt as the ember proceeds down the cone, it burns relatively fast, and produces more smoke and more charred aroma, especially with materials such as herbs, and that makes them burn in a less refined way than the sticks. 

Agarbatti
Agarbatti (Incense Sticks with Bamboo Core):
Originated in China, and also very popular in India, are incense sticks with a bamboo core. Higher end sticks used to have a sandalwood core. Either way, the core gives the incense stick durability during transport, and also a very accessible way to hold it upright wherever it may be required. Because of its unique aromatic makeup, Agarbatti tends to have a thick and lingering smoke, and also is slow to burn. You may even find that you'd like to put it out before it gets consumed on its own. Some find that the bamboo core is a destruction from the scent and making it less pure, but I haven't noticed that to be of significance as the bamboo has a very neutral scent. 

Incense Sticks
Dhoop or Masala Sticks (Core-less Incense Sticks):
The most sophisticated incense blends are offered in this format: from the relatively thick medicinal, herbal incense of rich exotic aromas coming out of Tibet to the finest Japanese incense, which is both delicate and without hardly any smoky off-notes, as well as the thinest sticks made anywhere in the world. The incense requires a special vessel with the correct size hole to hold the stick in place, as well as receipt its ashes. Because such incense does not have a core, the very end bit of it will always get "wasted" if using such a dish. An even more refined way to enjoy this type of incense is placing it horizontally inside a kodoh cup or in a bowl filled with ash. This ensure the stick burns in its entirety. Another thing to keep in mind for this sticks, is that they break more easily. This is an advantage of course when wanting to portion them out and make them fit horizontally into an ash vessel. Another neat thing about incense sticks, is that they may be used for measuring time. They were used in such manners for many purposes, from telling time in general, with sophisticated incense that would change scent at certain time intervals; Geishas used to bill their clients based on how many incense sticks would need to be burnt; and also, a practice we still use today is to frame a meditation practice with a certain scent that lasts a certain amount of time (most incense sticks burn from 20-60min) . What makes them perfect for meditation, is that they can be left alone to burn, being "low maintenance" during burning time; and also once the scent is over, one knows it's time to bring the meditation to a close. 

Incense Coils
Simply a different shape for the same type of incense as cones or dhoop, only shaped into a spiral. These could be shaped into very large and slightly flexible coils that can be hang from above from the centre of the spiral, and the flexibility allows the weight to pull them downwards without breaking. Smaller coils which are more stiff would either have a hole in their centre to attache them to a holder from underneath, or they can be placed on rice ash in a Koh-Doh cup. The advantage of incense coils is that they take less space and burn for much longer than a straight stick would. 

Pliable Dhoop
A form of incense which I have encountered only once, is a pliable dhoop, or incense dough, that remains soft after its been aged. This is due to a unique makeup that I'm yet to figure out, but supposedly key components are both from the Holy Cow: dried up and finely ground cow dung, and clarified butter (ghee). One would form a "snake" and coil it up into a spiral for storage. When burning the incense, a small piece of the "snake" is pinched and pressed into the wall, dangling down. The bottom tip is lit and the ember would travel up, while the ashes fall to the floor.  Somehow I imagine it especially befitting if you dwell in a cave and don't care about the walls and the floor getting covered in ashes and charred marks. 

Incense Trails:
Incense trails are even more sophisticated method of burning incense, in which special designs of combustible incense powder are sprinkled onto rice ash, then lit up. To be done properly, it does require expertise and special tools, including ornately designed presses that look like mazes and may also be used for time measurement. This is more of a lost art, although some incense makers still use this method to test their combustible blends before shaping them into cones or sticks. in Korea this practice was especially developed, and is on the verge of becoming lost. 

Incense Ropes:
Tibetan-style incense, in which the powdered mixture of combustible incense is enclosed in Tibetan handmade Lokta paper, which is then twisted into a rope shape and folded in half. There's a little hoop in the middle that is used for holding the incense on a hook upside down. Like the dhoop snake, it is lit from the bottom. Another good method for cave-dwellers and long dark hallways of monasteries. The spent paper leaves quite a bit of a mess. But it's worth it for the exotic earthy scents of the Himalayan incense plants. 

Papier d'Armenie (Incense Wafers):
European tradition of soaking card-stock or thinner paper in a solution of saltpetre, benzoin, styrax and other aromatics. These are left to dry out, and then folded  into zig-zag so they can stand up. They're lit and blown out and still burn rather rapidly due to the saltpetre. The scent is usually very powdery, sweet and slightly floral. It's a very short-lived and very old-fashioned smell. 

Summary:
There are many ways to burn and enjoy incense, and each fits a certain mood, settings and intentions. Find the right method that suits your lifestyle, needs and of course the occasion. You may find you have more than one favourite method of burning incense for different occasions. They are all wonderful, and a creative way to add scent to the day and enhance well-being.  

Happy Chanukah!

Happy Chanukah!

Wishing you all a joyous Chanukah, filled with light, warmth, fragrant donuts and cozy company. Chanukah originated in festivities for the culmination of the olive harvest - a crop that is not only nutritious and beneficial for the skin, but also the source of light way before kerosene lamps and beeswax candles were thought of.
During Chanukah (December 10-18), receive 20% off on orders of $100 or more with code Chanukah2020.
Here are 8 ways to celebrate the Fête of of Light and Phat! 

Shop for our delightful winter offerings, offered at 20% off with code Chanukah2020 thru December 18, 2020.

Greek Goddess & Olive Oil
Chanukah was originally a festival to celebrate the olive oil harvest. While it is not particularly useful in modern perfumery, Olive oil was the base of the ancient perfumes on the island of Cyprus, where the first perfume factory was excavated. Keeping up with this Greek theme, I suggest you try a perfume that is inspired by my favourite Greek Goddess - Palas Atena, the Goddess of Wisdom and War. You can enjoy it as a parfum oil, Eau de Parfum (in two sizes, mini or 15mL Eau de Parfum). And last but not least - also a hair oil, that is both fragrant and nourishing and can be used as a low maintenance styling product (just work it into your damp hair with your fingertips). 


New! Nag Champa Agarbatti (Indian Incense Sticks)
Few of you may know of my "roots" as an incense maker. The past few years at my new studio enabled me to perfect a few formulae, and learn new technique. One of them is how to make agarbatti (Indian incense sticks with a bamboo core). This is an incense interpretation of Palas Atena, accentuating it's Nag Champa qualities, and using traditional ingredients such as ghee and honey to make these incense sticks release a luxurious and long-lasting smoke (they burn for 35-45min) that is perfect for large spaces. For smaller spaces, you may need to burn them for just five minutes at a time. You can order and enjoy our easy-to-use incense cones version of Palas Atena. Both are fashioned after the famous and beloved traditional Nag Champa - but made form only natural raw materials, infused with rare botanicals and hand-rolled by yours truly at my studio in Clil.


Laurel & Olive Ghar Soap (Aleppo-Style Soap)

Laurel & Olive Ghar (Aleppo-Style) Soap is the definition of pure luxury: two oils only, olive and laurel berry, pressed and combined to make a nourishing soap that is both luxurious, creamy, mildly cleansing. Because it is perfectly balanced and mild, it is appropriate for many sensitive skin conditions, and naturally fragrant without any scent added. Originating in the city of Aleppo, Syria, this is a unique, traditional soap in the Levant, that is produced only by a handful of small factories in Turkey and Syria, and now also offered by Ayala Moriel Parfums.


Sweet Olive (Osmanthus) Perfumes

Olives are great in your martini, but rarely finds its way into perfumes. It's sophisticated cousin Osmanthus though, is also known in the South as Sweet Olive. And indeed, it is a key component in In New Orleans and Charisma has it paired with sweet and warm spearmint and jasmine green tea over an incense base of our and tonka bean. Last but not least: Kinmokusei, my beloved Osmanthus soliflore, it is the star of the show.

Narcissi, Puddles and Mushrooms
This is the time of the year that Narcissus tazetta show their fragrant heads in our meadows. Narkiss (https://ayalamoriel.com/collections/seasonal-ltd-edition/products/narkiss) is its Hebrew name, and the name for the perfume that truly embodies the spirit of Kislev, the Hebrew month in which Chanukah takes place (Kislev 25 falls this year on the eve of Thursday, December 10th). Narkiss perfume smells like winter in Israel, with the slightly incense, green and heady perfume of wild narcissi against the drunken earth, rain puddles, and the moist and elusive scent of mushrooms in the air. This sophisticated Chypre is suitable for both men and women.


Winter Nerikoh
Nerikoh is Japanese kneaded incense that has been fermented underground for at least six months. Nerikoh is never burnt, but rather warmed on an incense heater, to accompany the tea ceremony. You needn't any fancy equipment to enjoy it, and a tiny pinch of one of these tiny balls will scent a room for hours on end. Use an aromatherapy diffuser, or place on top of your wood stove or radiator. It will release a gentle scent of spices, resins and woods. Choose from our most delectable scents for winter: Wind in the Palm Trees AKA Oasis Nerikoh (with dates and Ras el Hanout), or Saturn Nerikoh (with starwood, patchouli and myrrh).

Za'atar, Olive & Seawater Soap Bar
Za'atar & Olive is 100% olive oil, and not just any olive oil, but the purest virgin olive oil that was organically grown and harvested in my family's olive groves. This soap bar is made in the tradition of Savon de Marseilles, with filtered seawater from the Mediterranean sea. And to make it even more wild, it is scented with oil of oregano and sprinkled with Za'atar blend.

Black Licorice Soap Bar (Limited Edition)
Black Licorice soap (https://ayalamoriel.com/products/black-licorice-limited-edition-soap-bar) bar is, no doubt, the most colourful among my soap offerings. And colour and cheer is exactly what we need during these short winter days. This is our tried and true formula that is hydrating, creamy, with rich lather and non-drying. It is scented with our proprietary Black Licorice fragrance , tweaked to suit a soapy scene and thus resembles also the now defunct SenSen candy - another delectable anise candy and breath freshener from Asia. Makes a wonderful holiday gift that is fun to give and receive.

Shop for more winter treats, offered at 20% off with code Chanukah2020 thru Friday, December 18, 2020.

 

Incense Cone Making Blueprint

Incense Cone Making Blueprint

Disclaimer: All of the posts related to Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine are limited time offers and bonuses are likely not going to be relevant if you sign up at a much later date than this post was written. 

Today in the Hand-Crafted Incense Workshop Series, you are invited to learn how to put aromatic ingredients together to make your own incense cones!

This morning my friend Evan, founder of The Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine, released his final video in The Hand-Crafted Incense Workshop Series.

Now that you’ve learned the important elements and foundational aspects of this ancient craft in his first 2 videos, in this lesson you’ll learn how to actually put it all together to make amazing smelling, fully burning incense cones.

Jump into lesson 3 now 

I know I’ve been learning a lot in this series so far, and I’m sure you’re as excited as I am to get the last piece of the puzzle in place.

In this final workshop Evan shares:

  • His step-by-step guide to making any kind of incense cones
  • The proper consistencies of botanical ingredients necessary for making different types of incense
  • When to add your bases, aromatic ingredients, binders, and water to create the perfect incense dough
  • What all traditional incense crafters do right before they make incense
  • How to mix, form, dry, and store your incense cones
  • and much more..

You're moments away from knowing how to formulate and craft your own medicinal or ritual incense blends from start to finish. 

Click here to watch the 3rd lesson, and don't forget to download your Incense Making Blueprint Workbook under the video.

I'll see you there!

Ayala

P.S. - If you haven’t watched the first two lessons in this series, it’s not too late to catch up. But there’s just a few days left to watch all 3 workshop videos.

The Building Blocks of Incense Revealed

The Building Blocks of Incense Revealed

Disclaimer: All of the posts related to Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine are limited time offers and bonuses are likely not going to be relevant if you sign up at a much later date than this post was written. 

Incense is the Original Aromatic Medicine.. It's been around since before essential oils, even before perfumery.

It's the oldest aromatic practice for healing the emotions, psyche, physical body, and spirit.

Not to mention it's the most universal tool to accompany all things spiritual, and is present in nearly every sacred ritual on earth.

And of course, it's aromas are heavenly.. beautiful.. relaxing.. and the ultimate comfort. Incense is the universal modality for enriching and bringing about greater balance in life.

How would you like to harness the countless benefits of this timeless aromatic practice by learning to make your own incense at home?

Today my friend Evan, founder of The Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine, released his second complimentary training session in The Hand-Crafted Incense Workshop Series and he'd love to show you how you can make your own incense for healing, ritual, or fragrance.

Whether you're an at-home healer, aromatherapist, health practitioner, use incense in a spiritual practice, or you just love the heavenly fragrances of plants and resins...

...this complimentary series will help you learn all you need to know to make your own successful, effective, fully burning incense at home for yourself, your loved ones, or clients.

In his 2nd training session Evan will walk you through the Core Pillars of Incense Crafting one by one, explaining how they'll work together to strengthen an incense crafting practice. 

 

 

In this new session you'll learn:

  • What botanicals make the best foundation for a natural incense blend
  • How to properly use gums and binders to hold your incense cones and sticks together
  • What types of plant materials are most commonly used in incense and why
  • Why learning the art of incense is crucial for practicing aromatherapy holistically
  • How prayer, intentions, mantras, and sacred songs are traditionally infused into incense around the world 

After watching this next lesson you'll be well on your way to crafting amazing and effective incenses. 

You're gonna love this session! And don't forget to download the Building Block of Incense electronic workbook.
I'll see you in the workshop. 

xo
Ayala

P.s. In case you were wondering - in later videos I will be also presenting a mini-series of perfumery workshops in the Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine.

 

Make Your Own Incense for Healing, Ritual, & Pleasure

Make Your Own Incense for Healing, Ritual, & Pleasure

Disclaimer: All of the posts related to Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine are limited time offers and bonuses are likely not going to be relevant if you sign up at a much later date than this post was written. 

Incense is the oldest form of aromatic medicine. It's been used to treat the psyche, emotions, body, and heal the spirit for ages. Plus it’s the most ancient and universal tool for nearly all sacred rituals.

And of course, incense is a timeless aromatic treasure used to help us celebrate our sense of smell and have a bit of natural luxury and pleasure in our lives.

I’ve always loved incense. And am thrilled to share with you a new course that is offered online that will teach you how to make simple and fun incense, for any intention you have in mind, whether for a lovely fragrant gift for someone, or a medicine.

If you've ever desired the ability and skills to hand-craft your own beautiful, effective, and successful incense blends for yourself, your family, or others - you should check out this program! 

For almost a decade now my good friend Evan Sylliaasen, founder of The Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine, has been crafting aromatherapeutic and ritual blends for his company Higher Mind Incense, one of the top producers in the US. He’s definitely seen what works best, and what doesn't work when it comes to incense crafting.

That's why he’s put together a special gift for you, the Hand-Crafted Incense Workshop Series!

Join this complimentary Workshop and start watching the 1st Lesson now.

In this workshop series, Evan will show you step-by-step how to craft your own incense cones for healing, fragrant enjoyment, or spiritual purposes, plus give you the ultimate background on the many uses and virtues of incense.

This fun and informative series is available for a limited time so be sure to sign up today, at no charge!

Join Evan in the Hand-Crafted Incense Workshop Series, his gift to you. 

Enjoy and I’ll see you inside!

xo
Ayala

P.s. In case you were wondering - in later videos I will be also presenting a mini-series of perfumery workshops in the Northwest School of Aromatic Medicine.

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